All Stories in Health

English-style diet ‘could save 4,000’

English-style diet ‘could save 4,000’

Eating like the English could save 4,000 lives a year in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, a study claims.People in England eat more fruit and vegetables and less salt and fat, reducing heart disease and some cancers, say Oxford University experts. A tax on fatty …

Breast cancer link to small amount of alcohol

Breast cancer link to small amount of alcohol

Regularly drinking even a small quantity of alcohol could increase the risk of breast cancer, say researchers.A study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggested that between three and six small glasses of wine a week was linked to a 15% increase …

Mobile phone brain cancer link rejected

Mobile phone brain cancer link rejected

Further research has been published suggesting there is no link between mobile phones and brain cancer.The risk mobiles present has been much debated over the past 20 years as use of the phones has soared. The latest study led by the Institute of Cancer Epidemiology …

Pill ‘lowers ovarian cancer risk’

Pill ‘lowers ovarian cancer risk’

Women who take the Pill for 10 years almost halve their risk of ovarian cancer, according to a study.But experts say this must be balanced against the risk of breast cancer, which is higher in women on the Pill. For every 100,000 women on the …

Study finds link between swine flu and stillbirth

Study finds link between swine flu and stillbirth

Babies born to mothers who contracted the swine flu virus faced a much greater risk of being stillborn, according to a new study.Baby deaths among women infected with the 2009 strain of the virus were five times higher than normal. There was also a greater …

Veg ‘lowers genetic heart risk’

Veg ‘lowers genetic heart risk’

People who are genetically susceptible to heart disease can lower their risk by eating plenty of fruit and raw vegetables, a study suggests.It says five or more daily portions should be enough to counteract culprit versions of a gene on chromosome 9, thought to be …

Vitamin pills ‘may shorten life’

Vitamin pills ‘may shorten life’

When it comes to vitamins, it appears you could have too much of a good thing, say researchers who report a link between their use and higher death rates among older women.Experts have suspected for some time that supplements may only be beneficial if a …

Weight loss plan ‘lacks evidence’

Weight loss plan ‘lacks evidence’

‘Nudging’ people to lose weight by thinking about their lifestyle shows little evidence of success, an analysis of published data suggests.It showed the step-by-step behavioural approach used in hospitals and clinics led to an average weight loss of 2kg or less. The report, by The …

Children’s packed lunches ‘lack fruit and veg’

Children’s packed lunches ‘lack fruit and veg’

Parents are failing to put enough fruit and veg into their children’s packed lunches, health experts have warned.The School Food Trust, which examined 3,500 packed lunches in England in 2009, says about 40% of lunchboxes do not contain any fruit or vegetables, compared with 10% …

Coffee may prevent depression

Coffee may prevent depression

Women who drink two or more cups of coffee a day are less likely to get depressed, research suggests.It is not clear why it might have this effect, but the authors believe caffeine in coffee may alter the brain’s chemistry. Decaffeinated coffee did not have …

Car fumes ‘raise heart attack risk

Car fumes ‘raise heart attack risk

  Breathing in heavy traffic fumes can trigger a heart attack, say UK experts.Heart attack risk is raised for about six hours post-exposure and goes down again after that, researchers found. They say in the British Medical Journal that pollution probably hastens rather than directly …

Smoking in films ‘encourages teenagers to take it up’

Smoking in films ‘encourages teenagers to take it up’

    Teenagers who watch films showing actors smoking are more likely to take it up, new UK research suggests.Experts who made the link by questioning 5,000 15-year-olds say their findings should prompt a change in film certification so that under-18s are no longer exposed …