Muhammad Ali public funeral set for Louisville on Friday

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Muhammad

The death of Muhammad Ali, the former heavyweight champion known as much for his political activism as his boxing brilliance, triggered a worldwide outpouring of affection and admiration for one of the best­known figures of the 20th century.

Ali, who had long suffered from Parkinson’s syndrome which impaired his speech and made the once­graceful athlete almost a prisoner in his own body, died on Friday at age 74.

Cause of death

The cause of death was septic shock due to unspecified natural causes, a family spokesman said on Saturday. Ali was admitted to a Phoenix­area hospital, HonorHealth, with a respiratory ailment on Monday

“He’ll be remembered as a man of the world who spoke his mind and wasn’t afraid to take a chance and went out of his way to be a kind, benevolent individual that really changed the world,” the family spokesman, Bob Gunnell, said at a press conference in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Despite Ali’s failing health, his youthful proclamation that he was “the greatest” rang true until the end for millions of people around the world who respected him for his courage both inside and outside the ring.

Along with a fearsome reputation as a fighter, Ali spoke out against racism, war and religious intolerance, while projecting an unshakeable confidence that became a model for AfricanAmericans at the height of the civil rights era and beyond.

Stripped of his world boxing crown for refusing to join the US Army and fight in Vietnam, Ali returned in triumph by recapturing the title and starring in some of the sport’s most unforgettable bouts.

Bursting onto the boxing scene in the 1960s with a brashness that threatened many whites, Ali would come to be embraced by Americans of all races for his grace, integrity and disarming sense of humor. “In the end, he went from being reviled to being revered,” civil rights leader the Rev. Jesse Jackson told CNN on Saturday.

A man who fought for us: Obama

President Barack Obama, the first African­American to reach the White House, said Ali was “a man who fought for us” and placed him in the pantheon of civil rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr and Nelson Mandela.

“His fight outside the ring would cost him his title and his public standing. It would earn him  enemies on the left and the right, make him reviled, and nearly send him to jail,” Obama said in a statement. “But Ali stood his ground. And his victory helped us get used to the America we recognize today.”

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